** June Challenge – Literary Fiction/Classics **

goodreads The Aussie Readers group on Goodreads has the June Challenge – Literary Fiction/Classics;

For our June challenge we will be reading Literary Fiction and/or picking up some Classics!
To qualify for the challenge you must read three (3) out of the five (5) listed…
1. Read a Literary Fiction that has won or been shortlisted for an Australian Award – name the literary award as well as the book:) List of Australian Literary Awards
2. Choose a Classic you’ve wanted to read for awhile…
3. Choose a book that has won or been shortlisted for a Literary Award, but not necessarily Australian…Literary Awards Winners & Nominees – name the literary award as well as the book:)
4. Readers choice Literary Fiction novel…
5. Anything of any genre at all from your TBR 🙂

litvgenr

1.) Choose a Classic you’ve wanted to read for awhile…
TomvSawyer Mark Twain – The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is the first of Mark Twain’s novels to feature one of the best-loved characters in American fiction, with a critical introduction by John Seelye in Penguin Classics. From the famous episodes of the whitewashed fence and the ordeal in the cave to the trial of Injun Joe, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is redolent of life in the Mississippi River towns in which Twain spent his own youth. A sombre undercurrent flows through the high humour and unabashed nostalgia of the novel, however, for beneath the innocence of childhood lie the inequities of adult reality – base emotions and superstitions, murder and revenge, starvation and slavery. In his illuminating introduction, noted Twain scholar John Seelye considers Twain’s impact on American letters and discusses the balance between humorous escapades and serious concern that is found in much of Twain’s writing. Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835-1910) trained as a steamboat pilot on the Mississippi river; ‘Mark Twain’, a phrase used on riverboats to indicate that the water is two fathoms deep, became the pseudonym by which he was best known. After the Civil War, Twain turned to journalism, publishing his first short story in 1865. Dubbed ‘the father of American literature’ by William Faulkner, Twain led a colourful life of travelling, bankruptcy and great literary success. If you enjoyed The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, you may like Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, also available in Penguin Classics. ‘The hero is one of the most endearing in literature’ Daily Telegraph.
(Media: Dead Tree, audiobook)
VERDICT:

2.) Readers choice Literary Fiction novel…
mockingbird Harper Lee – To Kill a Mockingbird
Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning masterwork of honor and injustice in the deep South ― and the heroism of one man in the face of blind and violent hatred.
One of the best-loved stories of all time, To Kill a Mockingbird has been translated into more than forty languages, sold more than thirty million copies worldwide, served as the basis of an enormously popular motion picture, and was voted one of the best novels of the twentieth century by librarians across the country.
A gripping, heart-wrenching, and wholly remarkable tale of coming-of-age in a South poisoned by virulent prejudice, it views a world of great beauty and savage inequities through the eyes of a young girl, as her father ― a crusading local lawyer ― risks everything to defend a black man unjustly accused of a terrible crime.

(Media: Dead Tree, audiobook)
VERDICT:

3.) Choose a book that has won or been shortlisted for a Literary Award, but not necessarily Australian…Literary Awards Winners & Nominees – name the literary award as well as the book:)
The Narrow Road to the Deep North was short listed for the 2014 Miles Franklin Award.

NarrowRoad Richard Flanagan – The Narrow Road to the Deep North
A novel of the cruelty of war, and tenuousness of life and the impossibility of love.
Richard Flanagan’s story — of Dorrigo Evans, an Australian doctor haunted by a love affair with his uncle’s wife — journeys from the caves of Tasmanian trappers in the early twentieth century to a crumbling pre-war beachside hotel, from a Thai jungle prison to a Japanese snow festival, from the Changi gallows to a chance meeting of lovers on the Sydney Harbour Bridge.
Taking its title from 17th-century haiku poet Basho’s travel journal, ‘The Narrow Road To The Deep North’ is about the impossibility of love. At its heart is one day in a Japanese slave labour camp in August 1943. As the day builds to its horrific climax, Dorrigo Evans battles and fails in his quest to save the lives of his fellow POWs, a man is killed for no reason, and a love story unfolds.

(Media: Dead Tree, audiobook)
VERDICT:
** 2015 October Challenge – Let’s go Travelling! **

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