This weeks links (2019-08-05)

In brief:

* Emergency texts from Apple Watch set off chain reaction to save mum-of-three’s life (2019-Jun-31) [news.com.au]

❝ If the Apple Watch Series 4 detects a hard fall while you’re wearing your watch, it taps you on the wrist, sounds an alarm and displays an alert.
If your watch detects that you have been immobile for about a minute, it will make the call to triple-0 automatically.
After the call ends, your watch sends a message to your emergency contacts with your location and lets them know that your watch detected a hard fall and dialled emergency services. ❞

* The Curry Chronicles (2019-Apr-09) [Gastropod]

❝ Curry is, supposedly, Indian. But there is no such word in any of the country’s many official languages—and no Indian would use the term to describe their own food. So what is curry? This episode takes us to India, Britain, and Japan on a quest to understand how a variety of spicy, saucy dishes ended up being lumped together under one name—and then transformed into something completely different as they were transported around the world. From a post-pub vindaloo in Leeds to comforting kare raisu in Kyoto, we explore the stories and flavors of curry—a dish that’s from nowhere and yet eaten nearly everywhere. ❞

* REI Presents: In Our Nature // Is #Photography Ruining the Outdoors?

Some reading/listening:

* 📻 Old Time Radio – Mr. Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons – Single Episodes [Internet Archive]
by Old Time Radio Researchers Group
When Mr. Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons first debuted over the Blue Network on October 12, 1937, the show’s title accurately described Keen’s stock-in-trade; the “kindly old investigator” tracked down individuals who had mysteriously vanished, leaving behind their families, homes, jobs and other day-to-day activities. Keen (he never had a first name, unless it was “Peachy”) was assisted in these duties by an Irishman named Mike Clancy. Mike wasn’t much of a brainiac (the quote that comprises the title of this post was a semi-catchphrase that he seemed to use on the show every week) but he could use the necessary brawn when the situation called for it. Bennett Kilpack played kindly ol’ Keen throughout most of the program’s run, as well as Philip Clarke and Arthur Hughes, while Jim Kelly took the role of Clancy. The series originally aired as a thrice-weekly fifteen-minute serial from 1937-43 (the show moved to CBS in 1942), providing more than ample time for Keen to solve even the most baffling of disappearances. …

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